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From the ‘culture wars’ to reparative histories

Gurminder K. Bhambra*email-imageGurminder K. Bhambra*

Gurminder K. Bhambra is Professor of Historical Sociology in the Department of International Relations, University of Sussex. She is co-author of Colonialism and Modern Social Theory (Bhambra & Holmwood, Polity, 2021), and co-editor of Imperial Inequalities: The Politics of Governance Across European Empires (Bhambra & McClure, Manchester University Press, 2022). She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2020. In 2022 she delivered a British Academy Lecture titled ‘For a reparatory social science’.

email-image G.K.Bhambra@sussex.ac.uk

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Elizabeth EdwardsElizabeth Edwards

Elizabeth Edwards is Professor Emerita of Photographic History, De Montfort University, Leicester, and Honorary Professor in the Department of Anthropology University College London and at the University of Durham. Her most recent monograph is Photographs and the Practice of History: A Short Primer (Bloomsbury, 2022). She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2015.

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Margot Finn§email-imageMargot Finn§§

Margot Finn is Astor Professor of British History at UCL. Her research focuses on British and British colonial history in the period c. 1750–1914, particularly the social history of the East India Company and its domestic impact in the British Isles. She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2019.

email-image m.finn@ucl.ac.uk

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Fiona WilliamsFiona Williams

Fiona Williams is Emeritus Professor of Social Policy at the University of Leeds. She is the author of Social Policy, A Critical and Intersectional Analysis (Polity, 2021), which was joint winner of the 2023 British Academy Peter Townsend Prize. She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2016.

Abstract

The ‘culture wars’ that dominate public discourse in the UK turn, very often, on the significance accorded to histories of empire, slavery, and colonialism. What seems to be primarily of concern is the place of such histories in the telling of our national story. In this section, the articles explore different ways in which we could think about the relationship of the past with the present. Specifically, the articles collected here use the frame of ‘reparative histories’ as a potentially more effective way of engaging with complex and contested pasts. They address the idea of a reparatory sociology, colonial photography, representation and indigenous spaces, the gendering of reparative histories, and the need to rethink the welfare state from such a perspective.

Keywords

culture warsempirecolonialismrepresentationphotographygenderwelfare statesreparationssociologyhistory
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Published on: 22 May 2024
Volume: 12
Issue: Issue 1 & 2
Article ID: a10
Copyright statement
© The author(s) 2024.
Cite this article
Bhambra with Edwards, Finn, Williams (2024), ' From the ‘culture wars’ to reparative histories ', Journal of the British Academy, 12(Issue 1 & 2): a10 https://doi.org/10.5871/jba/012.a10

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Normal View Dyslexic View

From the ‘culture wars’ to reparative histories

Gurminder K. Bhambra*email-imageGurminder K. Bhambra*

Gurminder K. Bhambra is Professor of Historical Sociology in the Department of International Relations, University of Sussex. She is co-author of Colonialism and Modern Social Theory (Bhambra & Holmwood, Polity, 2021), and co-editor of Imperial Inequalities: The Politics of Governance Across European Empires (Bhambra & McClure, Manchester University Press, 2022). She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2020. In 2022 she delivered a British Academy Lecture titled ‘For a reparatory social science’.

email-image G.K.Bhambra@sussex.ac.uk

,
Elizabeth EdwardsElizabeth Edwards

Elizabeth Edwards is Professor Emerita of Photographic History, De Montfort University, Leicester, and Honorary Professor in the Department of Anthropology University College London and at the University of Durham. Her most recent monograph is Photographs and the Practice of History: A Short Primer (Bloomsbury, 2022). She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2015.

,
Margot Finn§email-imageMargot Finn§§

Margot Finn is Astor Professor of British History at UCL. Her research focuses on British and British colonial history in the period c. 1750–1914, particularly the social history of the East India Company and its domestic impact in the British Isles. She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2019.

email-image m.finn@ucl.ac.uk

,
Fiona WilliamsFiona Williams

Fiona Williams is Emeritus Professor of Social Policy at the University of Leeds. She is the author of Social Policy, A Critical and Intersectional Analysis (Polity, 2021), which was joint winner of the 2023 British Academy Peter Townsend Prize. She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2016.