Journal of the ...Volume 11 Supplementary i... Exploring medic...
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Introduction

Exploring medical mistrust: from clinic to community

Megan Schmidt-Sane*email-imageMegan Schmidt-Sane*

Dr Megan Schmidt-Sane is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies in Brighton. She is a medical anthropologist with training in public health and her work focuses on the political economy of health, with regard to epidemics and urban informal settlements.

email-image m.schmidt-sane@ids.ac.uk

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Elizabeth StorerElizabeth Storer

Dr Elizabeth Storer is a Lecturer in Health Geography at Queen Mary, University of London. She is a health geographer, working across a broad range of disciplines including geography, anthropology, development studies and public health. Her research broadly explores forms of care which are not adequately valued by the state and international health actors.

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Santiago Ripoll§Santiago Ripoll§§

Dr Santiago Ripoll is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies. He is a social anthropologist with skills and experience in social science analysis, participatory and anthropological methods, in the fields of public health emergencies and food systems. His academic research focuses on social context, experience and ethics.

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Tabitha HrynickTabitha Hrynick

Tabitha Hrynick is a Research Officer at the Institute of Development Studies. She has training in sociology and development studies and has researched health equity in the United Kingdom and epidemic preparedness and response in global contexts.

Abstract

This introduction to the special issue, Exploring Medical Mistrust: From Clinic to Community, provides a conceptual framing of ‘medical mistrust’ from a critical social science lens. This special issue explores and unpacks the complex temporal, social and scalar relationships which are intertwined with contemporary manifestations of mistrust in medicine. We ask what social science and humanities disciplines can offer in relation to wider understandings of the processes driving resistance to and refusal of medical interventions, including but also beyond vaccines. We distil insights derived from diverse spaces of medical encounter, ambivalence and resistance that serve as arenas which generate mistrust. We bring this analysis to deepen an understanding of the frictions and affective relations which exist between vertical and horizontal relations which constitute health systems.

Keywords

medical mistrustsocial scienceanthropologyCOVID-19trust
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Published on: 19 December 2023
Volume: 11
Issue: Supplementary issue 6
Article ID: 001
Pages:1 - 12
Copyright statement
© The author(s) 2023.
Cite this article
Schmidt-Sane with Storer, Ripoll, Hrynick (2023), ' Exploring medical mistrust: from clinic to community ', Journal of the British Academy, 11(Supplementary issue 6): 001 https://doi.org/10.5871/jba/011s6.001

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Normal View Dyslexic View

Exploring medical mistrust: from clinic to community

Megan Schmidt-Sane*email-imageMegan Schmidt-Sane*

Dr Megan Schmidt-Sane is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies in Brighton. She is a medical anthropologist with training in public health and her work focuses on the political economy of health, with regard to epidemics and urban informal settlements.

email-image m.schmidt-sane@ids.ac.uk

,
Elizabeth StorerElizabeth Storer

Dr Elizabeth Storer is a Lecturer in Health Geography at Queen Mary, University of London. She is a health geographer, working across a broad range of disciplines including geography, anthropology, development studies and public health. Her research broadly explores forms of care which are not adequately valued by the state and international health actors.

,
Santiago Ripoll§Santiago Ripoll§§

Dr Santiago Ripoll is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies. He is a social anthropologist with skills and experience in social science analysis, participatory and anthropological methods, in the fields of public health emergencies and food systems. His academic research focuses on social context, experience and ethics.

,
Tabitha HrynickTabitha Hrynick

Tabitha Hrynick is a Research Officer at the Institute of Development Studies. She has training in sociology and development studies and has researched health equity in the United Kingdom and epidemic preparedness and response in global contexts.