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Research Article

Psychological influences on COVID-19 preventive behaviours and vaccination engagement in the United Kingdom and the United States: the significance of ethnicity

Glynis M. BreakwellGlynis M. Breakwell

Professor Dame Glynis Breakwell is a psychologist whose research focuses upon identity processes, social representations and the psychology of risk management, perception and communication. She has been an adviser to both public and private sector organisations on the use of psychological methods and theories, particularly concerning responses to public crises and major emergencies.

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Julie BarnettJulie Barnett

Professor Julie Barnett is Associate Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Professor in Health Psychology at the University of Bath. She has a particular interest and expertise in risk: public appreciation of risk, risk communication and risk management. Other research interests include the role of social connection in addressing loneliness and social isolation, social prescribing and the increasing integration of digital technology with our everyday lives.

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Rusi Jaspal§Rusi Jaspal§§

Professor Rusi Jaspal is Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research and Knowledge Exchange) and Professor of Psychology at the University of Brighton. He has produced over two hundred peer-reviewed publications, including six books, which mainly focus on aspects of identity in the context of social change.

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Daniel B. WrightDaniel B. Wright

Daniel Wright is Professor of Educational Psychology. His interests are in quantitative methods and applied cognitive science (in particular learning in groups).

Abstract

Two studies are reported here: a mapping review of literature on the effect of ethnicity on psychological influences upon COVID-19 responses, and a survey simultaneously undertaken in the United Kingdom and United States designed to examine ethnic differences in levels of, and in relationships between, identity resilience, social support, science trust, COVID-19 fear, COVID-19 risk and vaccination likelihood. The review found that very few studies during 2020–2021 examined the effect of ethnicity on the psychological influences on COVID-19 preventive behaviours. The survey study found that science trust, vaccine positivity, perceived risk, COVID-19 fear, identity resilience and social support account for roughly 50 per cent of the variability in COVID-19 vaccination likelihood. Ethnic categories report different levels of these influences but similarity in the way they interact. Taken together, the results indicate that a single model of psychological influences on vaccination decisions is applicable across ethnic categories.

Keywords

ethnic differencesCOVID-19 fearCOVID-19 riskCOVID-19 vaccination likelihoodvaccine positivityidentity resiliencesocial supportscience trust
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Published on: 14 December 2023
Volume: 11
Issue: Supplementary issue 5
Article ID: 083
Pages:83 - 112
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© The author(s) 2023.
Cite this article
Breakwell with Barnett, Jaspal, Wright (2023), ' Psychological influences on COVID-19 preventive behaviours and vaccination engagement in the United Kingdom and the United States: the significance of ethnicity ', Journal of the British Academy, 11(Supplementary issue 5): 083 https://doi.org/10.5871/jba/011s5.083

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Thematic article

Normal View Dyslexic View

Psychological influences on COVID-19 preventive behaviours and vaccination engagement in the United Kingdom and the United States: the significance of ethnicity

Glynis M. BreakwellGlynis M. Breakwell

Professor Dame Glynis Breakwell is a psychologist whose research focuses upon identity processes, social representations and the psychology of risk management, perception and communication. She has been an adviser to both public and private sector organisations on the use of psychological methods and theories, particularly concerning responses to public crises and major emergencies.

,
Julie BarnettJulie Barnett

Professor Julie Barnett is Associate Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Professor in Health Psychology at the University of Bath. She has a particular interest and expertise in risk: public appreciation of risk, risk communication and risk management. Other research interests include the role of social connection in addressing loneliness and social isolation, social prescribing and the increasing integration of digital technology with our everyday lives.

,
Rusi Jaspal§Rusi Jaspal§§

Professor Rusi Jaspal is Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research and Knowledge Exchange) and Professor of Psychology at the University of Brighton. He has produced over two hundred peer-reviewed publications, including six books, which mainly focus on aspects of identity in the context of social change.

,
Daniel B. WrightDaniel B. Wright

Daniel Wright is Professor of Educational Psychology. His interests are in quantitative methods and applied cognitive science (in particular learning in groups).